Towersey step in to save the music therapy service at Rowcroft Hospice.

Towersey's first success back in 1998 was to set up the music therapy service at Rowcroft Hospice in Torquay. 

For 18 years music therapy has been a thriving and dynamic part of the multi disciplinary team, supporting the holistic care offered by the hospice across South Devon. The current post holder, David Holmes, has since 2008 been working with over 50 patients a year along with their relatives and friends. This work has taken place in the in-patient unit, in the dedicated music room and out and about in the community in patients' homes and nursing homes. 

The hospice has run into hard times financially and music therapy along with art therapy, the Creative Therapies Department, has had to be cut.

 

Towersey is embarking on a campaign to raise the funds to keep the 2 days a week music therapy post going. The plan is to do this for 2 years at which point the hospice has expressed the intention of taking over the funding once again.

Towersey is as from November 2016, funding the post, with enough funds to keep it going until February 2017. 

 

Towersey therefore needs to raise  £33.502.00 This includes the salary of the music therapist and the employer's contributions to pension and national insurance. 

 

The campaign will explore a number of funding sources including local and national grant giving trusts and organisations, seeking support from the local community through publicity and fund raising events and social media campaigns. 

 

For immediate help, donations can be made through this web site and there will be regular updates here to let you know how the appeal is progressing. Please contact us if you would like to get involved.

 

Music therapy at Rowcroft has been described as Towersey's "Flag ship" project and we are very keen to help to keep it going as a vital resource for the community.  

                                                                                                          November 2016

Below are some testimonials, descriptions from patients and relatives who have been involved with music therapy at Rowcroft over the last few years

<

“Before discharge (from the hospice), I had a bedside visit from a music therapist who played the most delightful and soothing music. I was asked if I would like a home visit. ‘Oh yes please! Can we sing jolly songs?’ And we do! It’s one of the best hours, once a fortnight, when I lose myself, forget I struggle with walking and get oxygen into my lungs. What therapy!”

 

“My husband was admitted into Rowcroft 2015 and met the music therapist there. The therapist gave him such a focus and brought him back to life again. He looked forward to every session and thanks to the therapist rigging up a drum kit over the bed he was able to play. Not only that there was a group session in which I played the flute which I hadn’t done for years. It was the only time I ever played with my husband. I was so looking forward to another session but unfortunately he died before we could all play again. I can’t tell you the difference it made to all of us”.

“Another friend arrived during one session when I couldn’t visit and joined in the singing. She regards it as one of her happiest memories”.

 

“Endless thanks you to David (the music therapist). Richard really felt so much better after his sessions, it really helped him, and he was so different before and after that hour of playing the guitar. It brought a great deal of pleasure to him in his last months, thank you very much”

 

“My husband Alan had a great love of music but following his terminal diagnosis he was unable to find much pleasure in it, or indeed life itself. So to find a place where he could be encouraged to again enjoy music making with a like-minded person, within a caring environment was a wonderful discovery. The pleasure he gained from the sessions lasted way beyond just those days and enhanced his remaining months. Indeed, the music therapy gave Alan the confidence to once more, although ill, to perform in 2 concerts – one in aid of “Macmillan” and 1 in aid of Rowcroft.

Finally, David visited Alan in hospital and played for him while he was dying – what better farewell can there have been?”

 

“… Music works on many different levels …. It’s a shared journey of anger or vulnerability or glimpses of hope, and I think that accompanying individuals in this way has been of enormous benefit to them”.  Hospice chaplain.

New text box >>